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Monday, July 25, 2011

Singh Reviews Indian Satire

Hullabaloo in the Guava Orchard
By Kiran Desai
Author:Kiran Desai
Genre: Indian fiction/Comedy/Satire
Reviewed by Aakanksha Singh originally for Book Reviews Galore

The problem with reading an awesome novel by a particular author is the high expectations one has with the other novels and when that doesn't happen,you feel heartbroken for both yourself and the author. And that's exactly what happened with 'Hullabaloo In The Guava Orchard' written by Kiran Desai. Having read her other, more famous, Booker prize winning novel, 'The Inheritance Of Loss,' which is quite splendid weaving strands of varying themes into a beautiful story, I built up many sky high praises for Kiran Desai. But, unfortunately, her debut novel doesn't come close to her 2nd one. 'Hullabaloo In The Guava Orchard,' is a good read nonetheless, yet lacks the brilliance that lights up the storyline of 'The Inheritnace of Loss.'
Synopsis (from Christopher's Rare Books):
 
The plot of 'Hullabaloo In The Guava Orchard' begins with the birth of Sampath in an apparently middle class family living in a village named Shahkot. Then the novel does an Indian soap opera kind of leap and we see Sampath twenty years later, quite dull, and doomed as a failure by his father. Only his mother, Kulfi, has faith that her son will be able to be something in life. And ho! what do you know, he does manage to do just that. But not before getting fired from his clerk job in the post office and running away from Shahkot to be away from the misery of life. He then comes across a guava orchard and decides to climb on a guava tree and interestingly finds peace and solace over there. He feels uncluttered and unfettered on that tree. With a quirk of fate, he gets mistaken by a holy man atop a tree and his father gets a brilliant idea to juice out money from this venture. People flock to listen to his wise words and seek his advice and blessings! Sampath thus from being a good for nothing fellow becomes a famous Monkey Baba revered by one and all. Apart from Sampath, we get to see the rest of his peculiar family like his mother who relishes food and whipping up quite grand and glorious dishes. Then his sister, Pinky who falls in love with an ice cream seller, Hungry Hop.

The one word for this novel is eccentric. 'Hullabaloo In The Guava Orchard' reminds one of the bumbling comedies staged during Elizabethan Age that had similar comic situations with myriad quirky characters. The book gives a satirical take on rural/town India and its obsession with godly figures. It highlights the dishonesty that prevails among the fake babas that spring up in all nooks and corners. Of course, Sampath never intended to become a Monkey Baba. He in fact wanted to run away from all things pretentious. So perhaps Desai is trying to bring out how holy men should be in their heart and soul? Well, one can interpret it in anyway one wants. The characters are also well fleshed out particularly Kulfi whose love for food has been highlighted since page 1.

While the comic ans satirical part of the book is perfect, its the Bollywoodish touch and the simple, immature writing and the weak climax that make the book rather disappointing. Its quite entertaining and funny in its ludicrous situations but not really a must read, though a fun read!

Well, you could either go for it and enjoy the fun or avoid it completely. Take your pick!


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